Poly(vinyl amine) microparticles derived from N-Vinylformamide and their versatile use

buir.contributor.authorSütekin, S.Duygu
buir.contributor.orcidSütekin, S.Duygu|0000-0002-4605-1116
dc.citation.epage7751en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber9en_US
dc.citation.spage7729en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber79en_US
dc.contributor.authorDemirci, S.
dc.contributor.authorSütekin, S.Duygu
dc.contributor.authorKurt, S.B.
dc.contributor.authorGüven, O.
dc.contributor.authorSahiner, N.
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-16T10:51:56Z
dc.date.available2023-02-16T10:51:56Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-03
dc.departmentDepartment of Chemistryen_US
dc.departmentInstitute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology (UNAM)en_US
dc.description.abstractCationic polymers with primary amine groups that can easily be functionalized or coupled with substrates by complexation or hydrogen bonding are especially advantageous in preparing particles for biomedical applications. Poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) is a cationic polyelectrolyte containing the highest number of primary amine groups among any other polymers. Here, we introduce a general method in synthesizing PVAm microparticles via a surfactant-free water-in-oil emulsion technique using cyclohexane as the oil phase and aqueous PVAm solution as the dispersed phase. PVAm particles were prepared to employ two different bifunctional chemical crosslinkers, divinyl sulfone (DVS) and poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGGE). The prepared particles were further treated with HCl to protonate the amine groups of PVAm within particles. The effect of crosslinker types and pH on the hydrolytic degradation of PVAm particles were also investigated at three different solution pHs, 5.4, 7.4, and 9, to simulate the skin, blood, and intestinal pH environments, respectively. The blood compatibility of the PVAm particles was evaluated by in vitro hemolysis and blood clotting assays. Furthermore, antifungal and antibacterial efficacy of PVAm-based particles and their protonated forms were tested against C. albicans yeast and E. coli, S. aureus, B. subtilis, and P. aeruginosa bacterial strains. © 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00289-021-03874-9en_US
dc.identifier.issn01700839
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/111434
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://www.doi.org/10.1007/s00289-021-03874-9en_US
dc.source.titlePolymer Bulletinen_US
dc.subjectAntibacterial/antifungal materialen_US
dc.subjectBlood compatibleen_US
dc.subjectPoly(vinyl amine)en_US
dc.subjectPolymeric microparticlesen_US
dc.titlePoly(vinyl amine) microparticles derived from N-Vinylformamide and their versatile useen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
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