When do imposed sanctions work? The role of target regime type

Date
2022
Editor(s)
Advisor
Supervisor
Co-Advisor
Co-Supervisor
Instructor
Source Title
Journal of Conflict Resolution
Print ISSN
0022-0027
Electronic ISSN
1552-8766
Publisher
SAGE
Volume
0
Issue
0
Pages
1 - 28
Language
English
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Series
Abstract

A number of studies on sanction effectiveness have highlighted the importance of regime type and how it affects the sensitivity of sanctioned states (target) to the economic costs of sanctions. The scholarly consensus holds that mainly because of their responsiveness to domestic audiences, democratic regimes are most likely to give in to the demands of the sanctioning state (sender). I argue that regime type is important not only in influencing leaders’ sensitivity to economic costs—which create incentives to back down—but also to the audience costs—which create incentives to stand firm. I argue that taking the audience cost into account would lead to different predictions about the effect of democracy. Particularly, I argue that the effect of democracy is inverted- U shaped, where full democracies have no higher likelihood of meeting the demands of the sender than mixed (hybrid) regimes. Using a newly released dataset on economic sanctions between 1950-2020, I find robust support for my argument.

Course
Other identifiers
Book Title
Keywords
Citation
Published Version (Please cite this version)