Harbours of crisis and consent: the technopolitics of coastal infrastructure in colonial Cyprus, 1895-1908

Date
2016-09
Authors
Karas, S.
Arapostathis, S.
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Source Title
Journal of Transport History
Print ISSN
0022-5266
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Publisher
SAGE Publications
Volume
37
Issue
2
Pages
214 - 235
Language
English
Type
Article
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Abstract

By the late 1800s British colonial rule in Cyprus was experiencing both a socioeconomic and a legitimacy crisis. Britain's development projects were intended to quell the crisis and consolidate colonial authority. Famagusta Harbour construction was an integral part of that programme, but it antagonised wealthy and influential Cypriots in Larnaca. They believed that such infrastructure would undermine the importance of Larnaca harbour and threaten their commercial and political interests. Their protests threatened the colonial administration with a new crisis that was averted by the integration of Larnaca's Harbour into British plans. The colonial regime had to negotiate and co-operate with local networks of power in order to realise its development programme: harbour development was no mere rational engineering exercise.

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Keywords
Constructive imperialism, Crisis, Cyprus, Harbours, Politics, Harbor, Imperialism, Politics, Socioeconomic conditions, Spatiotemporal analysis, Cyprus, Famagusta [Cyprus], Larnaca, United Kingdom
Citation
Published Version (Please cite this version)