Do computer games enhance learning about conflicts? A cross-national inquiry into proximate and distant scenarios in Global Conflicts

Date
2015
Authors
Kampf, R.
Cuhadar E.
Advisor
Instructor
Source Title
Computers in Human Behavior
Print ISSN
0747-5632
Electronic ISSN
Publisher
Pergamon Press
Volume
52
Issue
Pages
541 - 549
Language
English
Type
Article
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Abstract

Interactive conflict resolution and peace education have developed as two major lines of practice to tackle intractable inter-group conflicts. Recently, new media technologies such as social media, computer games, and online dialogue are added to the existing set of tools used for peace education. However, a debate is emerging as to how effective they are in motivating learning and teaching skills required for peace building. We take issue with this question and have conducted a study investigating the effect of different conflict contexts on student learning. We have designed a cross-national experimental study with Israeli-Jewish, Palestinian, and Guatemalan undergraduate students using the Israeli-Palestinian and Guatemalan scenarios in the computer game called "Global Conflicts." The learning effects of these scenarios were systematically analyzed using pre- and post-test questionnaires. The study indicated that Israeli-Jews and Palestinians acquired more knowledge from the Guatemalan game than Guatemalans acquired from the Israeli-Palestinian game. All participants acquired knowledge about proximate conflicts after playing games about these scenarios, and there were insignificant differences between the three national groups. Israeli-Jews and Palestinians playing the Israeli-Palestinian game changed their attitudes about this conflict, while Guatemalans playing the Guatemalan game did not change their attitudes about this case. All participants changed their attitudes about distant conflicts after playing games about these scenarios. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Course
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Book Title
Keywords
Active learning, Attitude change, Global Conflicts, Guatemalan civil war, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Knowledge acquisition from games, Artificial intelligence, Education, Social networking (online), Students, Surveys, Active Learning, Attitude change, Civil war, Global Conflicts, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Computer games
Citation
Published Version (Please cite this version)