Neural correlates of distorted body images in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa: how is it different from major depressive disorder?

Limited Access
This item is unavailable until:
2024-06-28
Date
2023-06-28
Editor(s)
Advisor
Supervisor
Co-Advisor
Co-Supervisor
Instructor
Source Title
Journal of Neuropsychology
Print ISSN
1748-6653
Electronic ISSN
1748-6645
Publisher
John Wiley and Sons Ltd
Volume
18
Issue
1
Pages
154 - 172
Language
English
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Series
Abstract

Body image disturbance is closely linked to eating disorders including anorexia nervosa (AN). Distorted body image perception, dissatisfaction and preoccupation with weight and shape are often key factors in the development and maintenance of these disorders. Although the pathophysiological mechanism of body image disorder is not yet fully understood, aberrant biological processes may interfere with perceptive, cognitive and emotional aspects of body image. This study focuses on the neurobiological aspects of body image disturbance. The sample consisted of 12 adolescent girls diagnosed with AN, nine girls with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 10 without psychiatric diagnoses (HC, the healthy control group). We applied a block-design task in functional magnetic resonance imaging using participants' original and distorted overweight and underweight images. After imaging, the participants scored the images for resemblance, satisfaction and anxiety levels. The findings of this study demonstrate that overweight images elicited dissatisfaction and increased occipitotemporal activations across all participants. However, no difference was found between the groups. Furthermore, the MDD and HC groups showed increased activations in the prefrontal cortex and insula in response to underweight images compared to their original counterparts, whereas the AN group exhibited increased activations in the parietal cortex, cingulate gyrus and parahippocampal cortex in response to the same stimuli.

Course
Other identifiers
Book Title
Citation
Published Version (Please cite this version)