Democratic Manhood

dc.citation.epage130en_US
dc.citation.spage128en_US
dc.contributor.authorWinter, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, Bret E.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T12:55:32Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T12:55:32Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.departmentDepartment of American Culture and Literatureen_US
dc.description.abstractBetween 1815 and the 1840s, a concept of democratic manhood emerged in the United States, marking a conscious rejection of European (especially British) notions of ascribed social status. Strongly associated with Democratic president Andrew Jackson, democratic manhood was defined as political equality and broadened political participation among white men—and by the exclusion of women and nonwhites from the privileges of citizenship. It emphasized physical prowess and boisterous patriotism, expressed by the popularity of such frontiersmen as Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett. Furthermore, the concept informed a developing urban counterculture that resisted the aristocratic pretensions and bourgeois morality of an emerging middle class.
dc.identifier.doi10.4135/9781412956369.n66
dc.identifier.doi10.4135/9781412956369
dc.identifier.eisbn9781412956369
dc.identifier.isbn9780761925408
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/51381
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.publisherSAGE Publications, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Masculinities: A Historical Encyclopedia
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412956369.n66
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412956369
dc.subjectMen's Studies
dc.titleDemocratic Manhooden_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Democratic_Manhood.pdf
Size:
828.57 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format