Neural correlates of acquired color category effects

Date
2012
Authors
Clifford, A.
Franklin, A.
Holmes, A.
Drivonikou V.G.
Özgen, E.
Davies I.R.L.
Editor(s)
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Supervisor
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Source Title
Brain and Cognition
Print ISSN
0278-2626
Electronic ISSN
Publisher
Volume
80
Issue
1
Pages
126 - 143
Language
English
Journal Title
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Abstract

Category training can induce category effects, whereby color discrimination of stimuli spanning a newly learned category boundary is enhanced relative to equivalently spaced stimuli from within the newly learned category (e.g., categorical perception). However, the underlying mechanisms of these acquired category effects are not fully understood. In the current study, Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a visual oddball task where standard and deviant colored stimuli from the same or different novel categories were presented. ERPs were recorded for a test group who were trained on these novel categories, and for an untrained control group. Category effects were only found for the test group on the trained region of color space, and only occurred during post-perceptual stages of processing. These findings provide new evidence for the involvement of cognitive mechanisms in acquired category effects and suggest that category effects of this kind can exist independent of early perceptual processes. © 2012.

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Keywords
Category training, Color, Color categories, Event-Related Potentials, adult, article, brain function, cognition, color discrimination, controlled study, event related potential, female, functional assessment, human, human experiment, male, mental task, normal human, perceptive discrimination, priority journal, task performance, visual discrimination, visual nervous system, visual stimulation, Adult, Cerebral Cortex, Color Perception, Concept Formation, Discrimination (Psychology), Electroencephalography, Evoked Potentials, Female, Humans, Male, Photic Stimulation
Citation
Published Version (Please cite this version)