The effect of sound environment on spatial knowledge acquisition in a virtual outpatient polyclinic

buir.contributor.authorDalirnaghadeh, Donya
buir.contributor.orcidDalirnaghadeh, Donya|0000-0001-7971-9410
buir.contributor.orcidYilmazer, Semiha|0000-0001-9522-1102
dc.citation.epage15en_US
dc.citation.spage1en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber100en_US
dc.contributor.authorDalirnaghadeh, Donya
dc.contributor.authorYilmazer, Semiha
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-17T10:54:22Z
dc.date.available2023-02-17T10:54:22Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-28
dc.departmentDepartment of Interior Architecture and Environmental Designen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the impact of the sound environment on spatial knowledge acquisition in a virtual outpa- tient polyclinic. Outpatient polyclinics have a salient role in determining early outpatient treatments of COVID- 19 to prevent hospitalization or death and reduce the burden on hospitals. However, they have not been widely investigated in the literature. The studies on spatial knowledge have identified environmental elements mainly related to vision with no focus on sound. Currently, there is limited research on the effect of sound environment on spatial knowledge acquisition in virtual outpatient polyclinics. In this study, a virtual simulated outpatient polyclinic has been created with varying levels of visual and audio cues. Eighty participants were assigned to one of the four groups: a control (no visual signage), a visual (visual signage), an only audio (no landmarks and no visual signage), and an audio-visual group. The virtual environment was presented as a video walkthrough with passive exploration to test spatial knowledge acquisition with tasks based on the landmark-route-survey model. The results showed that a combination of visual signage and sound environment resulted in higher spatial knowledge acquisition. No significant difference was found between the performance of the visual group and the control group that shows that signage alone cannot aid spatial knowledge in virtual outpatient polyclinics. Data from the only audio group suggests that landmarks associated with sound can compensate for the lack of visual landmarks that may help design a wayfinding system for users with visual disabilities.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apergo.2021.103672en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1872-9126
dc.identifier.issn0003-6870
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/111503
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2021.103672en_US
dc.source.titleApplied Ergonomicsen_US
dc.subjectLandmark-route-survey modelen_US
dc.subjectOutpatient polyclinicsen_US
dc.subjectSound environmenten_US
dc.subjectSpatial knowledgeen_US
dc.subjectVirtual environmentsen_US
dc.titleThe effect of sound environment on spatial knowledge acquisition in a virtual outpatient polyclinicen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
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