Cult of Domesticity

dc.citation.epage122en_US
dc.citation.spage120en_US
dc.contributor.authorWinter, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.editorCarroll, Bret E.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-17T12:55:32Z
dc.date.available2019-05-17T12:55:32Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.departmentDepartment of American Culture and Literatureen_US
dc.description.abstractThe “cult of domesticity” was first explored as a historical phenomenon in antebellum U.S. society by Barbara Welter, who wrote in 1966 of a “cult of true womanhood,” though the phrase itself was coined by the historian Aileen Kraditor in 1968. Part of a broader nineteenth-century northern middle-class ideology of “separate spheres,” the cult of domesticity identified womanhood with the private or domestic sphere of the home and manhood with the public sphere of economic competition and politics. While the cult of domesticity primarily concerned a definition of femininity, defining the home as a space governed by women's sentimental, moral and spiritual influence, this ideology also contributed to definitions of manliness and sought to control male passions at a time when the market revolution, urbanization, ...
dc.identifier.doi10.4135/9781412956369.n61
dc.identifier.doi10.4135/9781412956369
dc.identifier.eisbn9781412956369
dc.identifier.isbn9780761925408
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/51380
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.publisherSAGE Publications, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Masculinities: A Historical Encyclopedia
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412956369.n61
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781412956369
dc.subjectBreadwinners
dc.subjectCults
dc.subjectDomestic sphere
dc.subjectMiddle class
dc.subjectPublic sphere
dc.subjectWorking class
dc.subjectWorking men
dc.titleCult of Domesticityen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Cult_of_Domesticity.pdf
Size:
664.09 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format