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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jonathan C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-31T20:50:26Z
dc.date.available2021-03-31T20:50:26Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0039-3657
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/76066
dc.description.abstractIn this article, I argue that Thomas Gray's use of the elegy form in Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (1751) reveals poetry's struggle to know or comprehend the historical present. Not knowing how to memorialize the poor who have been presumably lost to history, Gray's elegist imagines alternate lives for the dead, thus recasting fictional imagination as historical remembrance and illustrating a divide between literary thought and historical reality. The Elegy thus bears witness to a form of poetic power that relies on obscuring rather than illuminating modernity and its mechanisms.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleStudies in English Literatureen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1353/sel.2018.0026en_US
dc.titleThomas Gray's elegy and the politics of memorializationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of English Language and Literatureen_US
dc.citation.spage653en_US
dc.citation.epage672en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber58en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/sel.2018.0026en_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins University Pressen_US
dc.contributor.bilkentauthorWilliams, Jonathan C.
dc.identifier.eissn1522-9270


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