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dc.contributor.authorÇelikkol, Ayşe
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-31T20:32:49Z
dc.date.available2021-03-31T20:32:49Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0084-0254
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/76061
dc.description.abstractThe metaphor of the wet highway, which Morris had rehearsed in the Water of the Wondrous Isles prior to its appearance in The Sundering Flood, ascribes to the flood the qualities associated with an artifice. The flood functions more effectively than its human-made counterpart, the road. In this description, connection to distant lands appears as natural as the rivers, seas and oceans themselves – it does not have to be mediated by technological developments that are shaped by the capitalist mode of production. Morris’s approach here resonates with today’s discourse on planetarity, which focuses on ecological networks that rival capitalist globalisation. As Amy Elias and Christian Morale write, the planetary indicates ‘a historically unprecedented web of relations among peoples, cultures, locales’ that have an ecological basis.2 This essay argues that William Morris’s late prose romances construe the planetary, and that, for Morris, such webs have a primeval character rather than constituting a recent development.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleJournal of William Morris Studiesen_US
dc.titleThe planetary in William Morris's late romancesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of English Language and Literatureen_US
dc.citation.spage15en_US
dc.citation.epage30en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber22en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber4en_US
dc.publisherWilliam Morris Societyen_US
dc.contributor.bilkentauthorÇelikkol, Ayşe


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