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dc.contributor.authorShaqiri, A.
dc.contributor.authorPilz, K. S.
dc.contributor.authorCretenoud, A. F.
dc.contributor.authorNeumann, K.
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Aaron
dc.contributor.authorKunchulia, M.
dc.contributor.authorHerzog, M. H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-11T08:42:24Z
dc.date.available2020-02-11T08:42:24Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn0012-1649
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/53260
dc.description.abstractThe world’s population is aging at an increasing rate. Even in the absence of neurodegenerative disorders, healthy aging affects perception and cognition. In the context of cognition, common factors are well established. Much less is known about common factors for vision. Here, we tested 92 healthy older and 104 healthy younger participants in 19 visual tests (including visual search and contrast sensitivity) and three cognitive tests (including verbal fluency and digit span). Unsurprisingly, younger participants performed better than older participants in almost all tests. Surprisingly, however, the performance of older participants was mostly uncorrelated between visual tests, and we found no evidence for a common factor.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleDevelopmental Psychologyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1037/dev0000740en_US
dc.subjectAgingen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectCommon factoren_US
dc.subjectCognitionen_US
dc.titleNo evidence for a common factor underlying visual abilities in healthy older peopleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.citation.spage1775en_US
dc.citation.epage1787en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber55en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber8en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/dev0000740en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.contributor.bilkentauthorClarke, Aaron


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