Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorOflazer, Kemalen_US
dc.contributor.editorvan Halteren, H.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T10:00:50Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T10:00:50Z
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789048152964
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/51448
dc.descriptionChapter 12
dc.description.abstractIn the previous chapters, we have seen that a lot of information about the potential tags of tokens in a text is found by lexicon lookup. Another, often complementary source of information is morphological analysis, i.e. the process of decomposing words into their constituents. The information about the individual constituents can be used to determine the necessary information about the word as a whole. Such information may range from basic wordclass information assigned from a fixed inventory of tags to structural information consisting of the relationships between components of the word further annotated with various features and their values (cf. Chapter 10). The English word “redness” could thus either be analysed as having the tag NN (singular noun) hiding its internal details, or be analysed by a suitable word grammar to have the structure Adj (red) + N (+ness) where the internal structure of the word has been made explicit.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSyntactic wordclass taggingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesText, speech and language technology;
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-9273-4_12en_US
dc.subjectLexical representationen_US
dc.subjectRoot worden_US
dc.subjectFront vowelen_US
dc.subjectLexical formen_US
dc.subjectBack vowelen_US
dc.titleMorphological analysisen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.citation.spage175en_US
dc.citation.epage205en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-015-9273-4_12en_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.identifier.eisbn9789401592734


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record