Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorShambayati, Hootanen_US
dc.contributor.editorArjomand, S. A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-08T08:10:46Z
dc.date.available2019-05-08T08:10:46Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781841137735
dc.identifier.isbn9781841137742
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/51156
dc.descriptionChapter 5en_US
dc.description.abstractMany modern constitutions, including those included in this volume, reflect ambitious programmes for transforming existing social, economic and political interests through political engineering. In countries like Iran and Turkey the underlying ideal of the constitution is not the protection of the existing nation but nothing less than the creation of a new nation. As Arjomand has noted, this desire for social engineering through constitutionalism is a characteristic of ideological constitutions found in many developing countries.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConstitutional politics in the Middle East: with special reference to Turkey, Iraq, Iran, and Afghanistanen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOnati International Series in Law and Society
dc.titleThe guardian of the regime: the Turkish Constitutional Court in comparative perspectiveen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage99en_US
dc.citation.epage121en_US
dc.publisherHart Publishingen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record