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dc.contributorGenetic Risk and Outcome of Psychosis (GROUP) consortiumen_US
dc.contributorPsychosis Endophenotypes International Consortium (PEIC)en_US
dc.contributor.authorCalafato, M. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThygesen, J. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRanlund, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZartaloudi, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCahn, W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCrespo-Facorro, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDíez-Revuelta, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorForti, M. D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHall, M. -H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIyegbe, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJablensky, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKahn, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKalaydjieva, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKravariti, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcIntosh, A. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcQuillin, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPicchioni, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRujescu, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShaikh, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorToulopoulou, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOs, J. V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVassos, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWalshe, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPowell, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, C. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, R. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBramon, E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-24T09:20:10Z
dc.date.available2019-02-24T09:20:10Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-1250
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/50574
dc.description.abstractBackground There is increasing evidence for shared genetic susceptibility between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Although genetic variants only convey subtle increases in risk individually, their combination into a polygenic risk score constitutes a strong disease predictor. Aims To investigate whether schizophrenia and bipolar disorder polygenic risk scores can distinguish people with broadly defined psychosis and their unaffected relatives from controls. Method Using the latest Psychiatric Genomics Consortium data, we calculated schizophrenia and bipolar disorder polygenic risk scores for 1168 people with psychosis, 552 unaffected relatives and 1472 controls. Results Patients with broadly defined psychosis had dramatic increases in schizophrenia and bipolar polygenic risk scores, as did their relatives, albeit to a lesser degree. However, the accuracy of predictive models was modest. Conclusions Although polygenic risk scores are not ready for clinical use, it is hoped that as they are refined they could help towards risk reduction advice and early interventions for psychosis. Declaration of interest R.M.M. has received honoraria for lectures from Janssen, Lundbeck, Lilly, Otsuka and Sunovian.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleThe British Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.2018.89en_US
dc.subjectBipolar disorderen_US
dc.subjectPolygenicen_US
dc.subjectPredictionen_US
dc.subjectPsychotic disordersen_US
dc.subjectPolygenic risk scoresen_US
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_US
dc.titleUse of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder polygenic risk scores to identify psychotic disordersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.citation.spage535en_US
dc.citation.epage541en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber213en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.2018.89en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1472-1465


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