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dc.contributor.authorKomins, B. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-08T08:13:07Z
dc.date.available2019-02-08T08:13:07Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.issn0195-7678
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/49117
dc.description.abstract1. In an earlier essay ("Succulent Tomatoes"), I discuss the derisive cultural, racial, and historical definitions of New Orleans' "original" settlers, from the political contests of the late nineteenth century to the parodic sensibilities of today. Like other phenomena on this "inland island," the meanings of Creole have developed in ways that respond to conflict and isolation. 2. I would like to thank Professor Michael Picone of the University of Alabama for his valuable comments and suggestions, particularly concerning New Orleans' meandering classifications and labels. 3. Professor Roach's book elegantly describes the various products and consequences of Creole "reciprocal acculturation" from the city's burial code through the political events and fanfare of carnival. Through both conversations and his text, Roach's provocative New Orleans work informs many of my ideas in this essay. 4. "Arrival at New Orleans. Forest of ships. Mississippi three-hundred feet deep. External appearance of the city. Beautiful houses. Huts. Muddy streets without pavements. Spanish architecture: flat roofs; English: bricks, small doors; French: massive portes cocheres. Population also mixed. Faces with every nuance of color. Language French, English, Spanish, Creole. General French look, however posters and commercial announcements mostly in English" (Translation mine). 5. "The evening at the theater . . . Strange sight presented in the auditorium: first loge, white; second, gray. Women of color, very pretty . . . Third loge black" (Translation mine). 6. For examples of these "ethnic works," see Vujnovich, Shofner and Ellsworth, and Reinecke. 7. I received Mrs. Stern's unpublished account of the German experience in New Orleans from Professor Richard Beavers of the University of New Orleans. 8. 8 This report is cited in John Duffy's Sword of Pestilence: The New Orleans Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1853. 9. Alan Lomax's Mister Jelly Roll consists of oral history, interviews, and second-hand reporting; the comments that I cite come from Jelly Roll's initial interview with Lomax at the Library of Congress. 10. There are several recorded versions of "Hyena Stomp" now available on compact disk, from early jazz anthologies to Jelly Roll Morton collections. My comments follow the 1992 redigitized recording referenced in the Works Cited.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleThe Comparatisten_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1353/com.2000.0022en_US
dc.subjectCreolesen_US
dc.subjectRace relationsen_US
dc.subjectMardi Grasen_US
dc.subjectNative cultureen_US
dc.subjectJazzen_US
dc.subjectLegaciesen_US
dc.subjectAfrican cultureen_US
dc.subjectSaladsen_US
dc.subjectAcclimatizationen_US
dc.subjectMusic instrumentationen_US
dc.titleThe convoluted logic of creolization the New Orleans wayen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentProgram in Cultures, Civilization and Ideasen_US
dc.citation.spage99en_US
dc.citation.epage122en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber24en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/com.2000.0022en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of North Carolina Pressen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1559-0887


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