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dc.contributor.authorMcLaren, L. M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-25T07:42:21Z
dc.date.available2019-01-25T07:42:21Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3816
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/48352
dc.description.abstractThis research note argues that much of the literature on support for European integration misses the heart of the nature of opposition to this process by ignoring the notion of perceived threat. Essentially, people are hostile toward the European project in great part because of their perceptions of threats posed by other cultures. I analyze this hypothesis by replicating a piece of research that previously appeared in this journal, adding measures of perceived threat to that model. The results support the main contention, which is that perceived cultural threat is an important factor that has been mistakenly ignored in explanations of hostility toward the European Union.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleThe Journal of Politicsen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2508.00139en_US
dc.titlePublic support for the European Union: cost/benefit analysis or perceived cultural threat?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage551en_US
dc.citation.epage566en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber64en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1468-2508.00139en_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1468-2508


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