Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWeisbrode, K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-23T16:15:46Z
dc.date.available2019-01-23T16:15:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-04en_US
dc.identifier.issn1537-7814
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/48291
dc.description.abstractLewis Einstein (1877–1967) was a little-known diplomat who became one of Theodore Roosevelt's closest advisers on European affairs. Roosevelt's attraction to Einstein derived not only from a keen writing style and considerable fluency in European history, literature and politics, but also from his instinct for anticipating the future of European rivalries and for the important role the United States could play there in preserving peace. The two men shared a perspective on the twentieth century that saw the United States as a central arbiter and enforcer of international order—a position the majority of Americans would accept and promote only after the Second World War. The relationship between Roosevelt and Einstein sheds light on the rising status of American diplomacy and diplomats and their self-image vis-à-vis Europe at the turn of the twentieth century.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleThe Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Eraen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1537781415000602en_US
dc.titleRoosevelt’ s man in Europeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Historyen_US
dc.citation.spage45en_US
dc.citation.epage59en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber15en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1537781415000602en_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1943-3557


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record