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dc.contributor.authorBilgin, Pınaren_US
dc.contributor.authorİnce, Başaken_US
dc.contributor.editorRumelili, B.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T13:40:13Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T13:40:13Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781317750154
dc.identifier.isbn9780415749121
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/37908
dc.descriptionChapter 6
dc.description.abstractWhen considered from today’s vantage point, attempts to create cohesive nationstates through forced migration and/or assimilation of peoples come across as sources of insecurity for all those affected (Krishna 1999). However, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, both forced migration and assimilation were adopted as conflict-regulation measures. The assumption was that ‘cohesive’ nation-states would be less conflict-prone than others (see Joenniemi Chapter 7). Authors of the Lausanne Treaty (1923) between Turkey and the European great powers adopted such an understanding of conflict regulation when they agreed on exchanging population between Greece and Turkey. In the following years Turkey’s Republican leaders engaged in various spatial, economic and cultural practices in the attempt to create a ‘cohesive’ body politic. In this chapter, we highlight multiple in/securities experienced by myriad peoples in Turkey – including those who were forced to migrate and others who were encouraged to assimilate in the early Republican period. Different from other accounts that have focused on insecurities of those who were forced to immigrate or those who were encouraged to assimilate (see Çelik Chapter 3), we also look at the experiences of ‘model citizens’ of the Republic, those who were fully integrated (and/or assimilated). We utilize the concept of ‘ontological (in)security’ in accounting for the experiences of this latter group who, we argue, were also in/secured as they became less able to live with ‘difference’.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConflict resolution and ontological security: peace anxieties
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781315796314en_US
dc.titleOntological (in)security of 'included' citizens: the case of early Republican Turkey (1923-1946)en_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.citation.spage117en_US
dc.citation.epage133en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4324/9781315796314en_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.identifier.eisbn9781315796314


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