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dc.contributor.authorDrivonikou G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClifford A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFranklin A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorÖzgen E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies I.R. L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T13:38:23Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T13:38:23Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9789027284853
dc.identifier.isbn9789027211880
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/37815
dc.description.abstractThere is indirect evidence that categorical colour perception (better discrimination of colours from different categories than those from the same category) can be learned. For instance, CP can be induced across a newly learned category boundary (Özgen & Davies 2002). Here we replicate and extend Özgen and Davies's category learning study to try and pinpoint the nature of the changes underlying category learning. Participants learned to divide green into two new categories 'yellow-green'/'blue-green' across four days. The trained group showed CP across the new boundary on a target detection task and this was restricted to the left hemisphere (LH; cf. Drivonikou et al. 2007), whereas the controls did not. The results could suggest that category training produces changes at early stages in visual processing mainly in the LH. © 2011 - John Benjamins B.V.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleNew Directions in Colour Studiesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1075/z.167.29drien_US
dc.titleCategory training affects colour discrimination but only in the right visual fielden_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.citation.spage251en_US
dc.citation.epage264en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/z.167.29drien_US
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Companyen_US


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