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dc.contributor.authorAydemir, N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVliegenthart, R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T11:41:36Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T11:41:36Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.issn0031-2290
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/37490
dc.description.abstractThis article focuses on how often and in what ways 'minority representatives' address cultural and/or religious rights and freedoms by analysing parliamentary questions between 2002 and 2012. The research first analysed to what extent, if any, Member of Parliaments of minority origin highlight minority-related issues in their parliamentary questions. Thereafter, it analysed the content of those questions in more detail. Unlike much previous research, we did not take a favourable content for granted. The idea of 'suppressive representation' was introduced to describe those cases in which 'minority representatives' were restrictive towards cultural and/or religious freedoms of 'immigrant minorities'. Representation patterns show differences across group-and individual-level identities. © 2015 The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Hansard Society; all rights reserved.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleParliamentary Affairsen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pa/gsv009en_US
dc.subjectContent analysisen_US
dc.subjectMinorityen_US
dc.subjectPolitical representationen_US
dc.subjectSupportive and suppressive representationen_US
dc.subjectThe Netherlandsen_US
dc.titleMinority representatives' in the Netherlands: supporting, silencing or suppressing?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administration
dc.citation.spage73en_US
dc.citation.epage92en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber69en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/pa/gsv009en_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US


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