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dc.contributor.authorTopuz, F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBartneck, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPan, Y.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTacke, F.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T11:09:34Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T11:09:34Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.issn1525-7797
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/37307
dc.description.abstractNanocomposite gels are a fascinating class of polymeric materials with an integrative assembly of organic molecules and organic/inorganic nanoparticles, offering a unique hybrid network with synergistic properties. The mechanical properties of such networks are similar to those of natural tissues, which make them ideal biomaterial candidates for tissue engineering applications. Existing nanocomposite gel systems, however, lack many desirable gel properties, and their suitability for surface coatings is often limited. To address this issue, this article aims at generating multifunctional nanocomposite gels that are injectable with an appropriate time window, functional with bicyclononynes (BCN), biocompatible and slowly degradable, and possess high mechanical strength. Further, the in situ network-forming property of the proposed system allows the fabrication of ultrathin nanocomposite coatings in the submicrometer range with tunable wettability and roughness. Multifunctional nanocomposite gels were fabricated under cytocompatible conditions (pH 7.4 and T = 37 °C) using laponite clays, isocyanate (NCO)-terminated sP(EO-stat-PO) macromers, and clickable BCN. Several characterization techniques were employed to elucidate the structure-property relationships of the gels. Even though the NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO) macromers could form a hydrogel network in situ on contact with water, the incorporation of laponite led to significant improvement of the mechanical properties. BCN motifs with carbamate links were used for a metal-free click ligation with azide-functional molecules, and the subsequent gradual release of the tethered molecules through the hydrolysis of carbamate bonds was shown. The biocompatibility of the hydrogels was examined through murine macrophages, showing that the material composition strongly affects cell behavior.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleBiomacromoleculesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.biomac.6b01483en_US
dc.subjectBiocompatibilityen_US
dc.subjectBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subjectCharacterizationen_US
dc.subjectCoatingsen_US
dc.subjectFabricationen_US
dc.subjectGelsen_US
dc.subjectHybrid materialsen_US
dc.subjectMechanical propertiesen_US
dc.subjectMoleculesen_US
dc.subjectTissueen_US
dc.subjectTissue engineeringen_US
dc.subjectCharacterization techniquesen_US
dc.subjectHigh mechanical strengthen_US
dc.subjectMaterial compositionsen_US
dc.subjectMultifunctional nanocompositesen_US
dc.subjectNano-composite coatingen_US
dc.subjectStructure property relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectSynergistic propertiesen_US
dc.subjectTissue engineering applicationsen_US
dc.subjectAnimalsen_US
dc.subjectBiocompatible materialsen_US
dc.subjectCell adhesionen_US
dc.subjectCells cultureden_US
dc.subjectHydrogelsen_US
dc.subjectMacrophagesen_US
dc.subjectMiceen_US
dc.subjectNanocompositesen_US
dc.subjectPolymersen_US
dc.titleOne-Step Fabrication of Biocompatible Multifaceted Nanocomposite Gels and Nanolayersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentInstitute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology (UNAM)en_US
dc.citation.spage386en_US
dc.citation.epage397en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber18en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acs.biomac.6b01483en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Societyen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1526-4602en_US


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