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dc.contributor.authorKalyoncu, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAhan, R. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOlmez, T. T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSafak Seker, U. O.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T11:06:46Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T11:06:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-06en_US
dc.identifier.issn2046-2069
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/37235
dc.description.abstractBacterial biofilms are promising tools for functional applications as bionanomaterials. They are synthesized by well-defined machinery, readily form fiber networks covering large areas, and can be engineered for different functionalities. In this work, bacterial biofilms have been engineered for use as conductive biopolymers to interface with electrodes and connect bacterial populations to electronic gadgets. Bacterial biofilms are designed with different conductive peptide motifs, as the aromatic amino acid content of fused peptide motifs has been suggested to contribute to electronic conductivity by influencing monomer stacking behavior. To select the best candidates for constructing conductive peptide motifs, conductivity properties of aromatic amino acids are measured using two different fiber scaffolds, an amyloid-like fiber (ALF) forming peptide, and the amyloidogenic R5T peptide of CsgA protein. Three repeats of aromatic amino acids are added to fiber-forming peptide sequences to produce delocalized π clouds similar to those observed in conductive polymers. Based on the measurements, tyrosine and tryptophan residues provide the highest conductivity. Therefore, the non-conductive E. coli biofilm is switched into a conductive form by genetically inserted conductive peptide motifs containing different combinations of tyrosine and tryptophan. Finally, synthetic biofilm biogenesis is achieved with conductive peptide motifs using controlled biofilm production. Conductive biofilms on living cells are formed for bioelectronics and biosensing applications.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleRSC Advancesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1039/c7ra06289cen_US
dc.subjectAmino acidsen_US
dc.subjectAromatic compoundsen_US
dc.subjectAromatic polymersen_US
dc.subjectAromatizationen_US
dc.subjectBiofilmsen_US
dc.subjectBiopolymersen_US
dc.subjectEscherichia colien_US
dc.subjectFibersen_US
dc.subjectMachineryen_US
dc.subjectProteinsen_US
dc.subjectScaffolds (biology)en_US
dc.subjectAromatic amino aciden_US
dc.subjectBacterial populationen_US
dc.subjectBiosensing applicationsen_US
dc.subjectConductive biofilmsen_US
dc.subjectConductivity propertiesen_US
dc.subjectElectronic conductivityen_US
dc.subjectFunctional applicationsen_US
dc.subjectTryptophan residuesen_US
dc.subjectPeptidesen_US
dc.titleGenetically encoded conductive protein nanofibers secreted by engineered cellsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentUNAM - Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology
dc.citation.spage32543en_US
dc.citation.epage32551en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber7en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber52en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/c7ra06289cen_US
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistryen_US


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