Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGunbey, H. P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBilgici, M. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAslan, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHas, A. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOgur, M. G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlhan, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorIncesu, L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-12T10:37:57Z
dc.date.available2018-04-12T10:37:57Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.issn0938-7994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/36376
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To provide an initial assessment of white matter (WM) integrity with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the accompanying volumetric changes in WM and grey matter (GM) through volumetric analyses of young children with Down’s syndrome (DS). Methods: Ten children with DS and eight healthy control subjects were included in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were used in the DTI study for whole-brain voxelwise analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of WM. Volumetric analyses were performed with an automated segmentation method to obtain regional measurements of cortical volumes. Results: Children with DS showed significantly reduced FA in association tracts of the fronto-temporo-occipital regions as well as the corpus callosum (CC) and anterior limb of the internal capsule (p < 0.05). Volumetric reductions included total cortical GM, cerebellar GM and WM volume, basal ganglia, thalamus, brainstem and CC in DS compared with controls (p < 0.05). Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that DTI and volumetric analyses may reflect the earliest complementary changes of the neurodevelopmental delay in children with DS and can serve as surrogate biomarkers of the specific elements of WM and GM integrity for cognitive development. Key Points: • DS is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. • WM and GM structural alterations represent the neurological features of DS. • DTI may identify the earliest aging process changes. • DTI-volumetric analyses can serve as surrogate biomarkers of neurodevelopment in DS. © 2016, European Society of Radiology.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleEuropean Radiologyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-016-4626-6en_US
dc.subjectBrainen_US
dc.subjectDown’s syndromeen_US
dc.subjectDTIen_US
dc.subjectMRIen_US
dc.subjectVolumetryen_US
dc.subjectBasal ganglionen_US
dc.subjectBrain functionen_US
dc.subjectBrain regionen_US
dc.subjectBrain stemen_US
dc.subjectCapsula internaen_US
dc.subjectChilden_US
dc.subjectChildhood diseaseen_US
dc.subjectClinical articleen_US
dc.subjectControlled studyen_US
dc.subjectCorpus callosumen_US
dc.subjectDiffusion tensor imagingen_US
dc.subjectDown syndromeen_US
dc.subjectFractional anisotropyen_US
dc.subjectGray matteren_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectNuclear magnetic resonance scanneren_US
dc.subjectPriority journalen_US
dc.subjectThalamusen_US
dc.subjectVoxel based morphometryen_US
dc.subjectDiagnostic imagingen_US
dc.subjectDiffusion tensor imagingen_US
dc.subjectPathophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectPreschool childen_US
dc.subjectProceduresen_US
dc.subjectCognitionen_US
dc.subjectDiffusion Tensor Imagingen_US
dc.subjectFemaleen_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectOrgan sizeen_US
dc.subjectWhite matteren_US
dc.titleStructural brain alterations of Down’s syndrome in early childhood evaluation by DTI and volumetric analysesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentNational Magnetic Resonance Research Center (UMRAM)en_US
dc.citation.spage3013en_US
dc.citation.epage3021en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber27en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber7en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00330-016-4626-6en_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record