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dc.contributor.authorBilgic, A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T11:01:57Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T11:01:57Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.issn1035-7718
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/26589
dc.description.abstractIn the discipline of international relations, the concept of trust has been theorised in two ways: the 'rationalist' approach and the 'normative' approach. This article aims to show that these approaches do not adequately reflect how trust operates in world politics and that trust provides a new way of understanding the identity-security nexus in international relations. It is argued that as actors learn to trust each other, this trust-learning process has a transformative effect on their definition of self-interests and identities. The elaborated understanding of trust in the security dilemma is operationalised in terms of the immigration security dilemma.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleAustralian Journal of International Affairsen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10357718.2013.841120en_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectImmigrationen_US
dc.subjectSecurityen_US
dc.subjectSecurity dilemmaen_US
dc.subjectTrusten_US
dc.subjectGeopoliticsen_US
dc.subjectImmigrationen_US
dc.subjectInternational relationsen_US
dc.titleTrust in world politics: converting 'identity' into a source of security through trust-learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.citation.spage36en_US
dc.citation.epage51en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber68en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10357718.2013.841120en_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1465-332X


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