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dc.contributor.authorBecker, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVignoles, V. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOwe, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEasterbrook, M. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, P. B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBond, M. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRegalia, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorManzi, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrambilla, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAldhafri, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGonzález, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarrasco, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCadena, M. P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLay, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGallo I. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTorres, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCamino L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorÖzgen E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGüner, Ü.E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYamakoğlu, N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLemos, F. C. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTrujillo, E. V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBalanta, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMacapagal, M. E. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, M. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHerman, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorde Sauvage, I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBourguignon, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Q.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFülöp, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarb, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChybicka, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMekonnen, K. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNizharadze, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGavreliuc, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBuitendach J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorValk, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKoller, S. H.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:59:46Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:59:46Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.issn0146-1672
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/26438
dc.description.abstractSeveral theories propose that self-esteem, or positive self-regard, results from fulfilling the value priorities of one's surrounding culture. Yet, surprisingly little evidence exists for this assertion, and theories differ about whether individuals must personally endorse the value priorities involved. We compared the influence of four bases for self-evaluation (controlling one's life, doing one's duty, benefitting others, achieving social status) among 4,852 adolescents across 20 cultural samples, using an implicit, within-person measurement technique to avoid cultural response biases. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses showed that participants generally derived feelings of self-esteem from all four bases, but especially from those that were most consistent with the value priorities of others in their cultural context. Multilevel analyses confirmed that the bases of positive self-regard are sustained collectively: They are predictably moderated by culturally normative values but show little systematic variation with personally endorsed values. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titlePersonality and Social Psychology Bulletinen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1177/0146167214522836en_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subjectİdentityen_US
dc.subjectSelf-esteemen_US
dc.subjectSelf-evaluationen_US
dc.subjectValuesen_US
dc.subjectAdolescenten_US
dc.subjectCultural anthropologyen_US
dc.subjectCultural factoren_US
dc.subjectHumanen_US
dc.subjectMaleen_US
dc.subjectQuestionnaireen_US
dc.subjectSelf concepten_US
dc.subjectSelf evaluationen_US
dc.subjectAdolescenten_US
dc.subjectCross-Cultural Comparisonen_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.titleCultural Bases for Self-Evaluation: Seeing Oneself Positively in Different Cultural Contextsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.citation.spage657en_US
dc.citation.epage675en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber40en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber5en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0146167214522836en_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publications Inc.en_US
dc.publisherSAGEen_US


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