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dc.contributor.authorTekelioǧlu O.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:46:55Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:46:55Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.issn9593543en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/25566
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses the theoretical status of human beings in the therapeutic sciences of modern societies. The concept of the 'individual' was shaped, and achieved an unsurpassable status in scientific discourse, during the 17th and 18th centuries. Likewise specialized disciplines have appeared to codify its 'normal' and 'deviant' conducts. Since the 1960s, there have arisen certain critical accounts challenging the existence of such an individual in social theory. I examine two perspectives questioning the status of the 'individual' in administrative practices at institutions of confinement: the anti-psychiatry movement and the post-structuralist critique of 'reason'. This paper contrasts these positions through the work of two exemplary thinkers (Goffman and Foucault), and reveals the impossibility of reconciliation, owing in the main to the very definition of the individual subject in theoretical discourse.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleTheory and Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectAnti-psychiatryen_US
dc.subjectFoucaulten_US
dc.subjectGoffmanen_US
dc.subjectIndividualityen_US
dc.subjectInstitutionalizationen_US
dc.titleTwo Incompatible Positions in the Challenge against the 'Individual Subject of Modernity'en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage215en_US
dc.citation.epage233en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber7en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US


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