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dc.contributor.authorBaydar, G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:30:45Zen_US
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:30:45Zen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.issn0263-7758en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/24533en_US
dc.description.abstractThis is a study of the link between the house and the city, based on a close reading of three historical statements from Western urban theory by Leone Batisti Alberti, Le Corbusier, and Paul Virilio. Sexualized metaphors of the house as the feminine, private realm and the city as the masculine, public realm proliferate in the modern period. However, rather than conforming to this conventional opposition, these three authors define the city in terms of the house. Their statements provide a curious link across temporal and geographical boundaries, with significant theoretical implications. In all three cases both the feminine figure and themes of loss and death underlie the desire to project the ideal city. In this paper I argue that these themes intertwine in complicated ways to assert urban identification in terms of a masculine desire of total control and mastery by silencing the feminine figure.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleEnvironment and Planning D: Society and Spaceen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1068/d326en_US
dc.subjectGender roleen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectUrban areaen_US
dc.titleSpectral returns of domesticityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Interior Architecture and Environmental Designen_US
dc.citation.spage27en_US
dc.citation.epage45en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber21en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/d326en_US
dc.publisherSAGEen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1472-3433en_US


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