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dc.contributor.authorPodoksik, E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:28:37Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:28:37Z
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.issn1474-8851
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/24391
dc.description.abstractThis article argues that Oakeshott's theory of freedom possesses a greater degree of coherence than is often perceived. Freedom in Oakeshott's philosophy may be defined as 'recognized contingency', combining the notions of a genuine choice of action and of an agent's awareness of having such a choice. Oakeshott employs his notion of freedom in two different contexts. One is the context in which freedom is understood as a concept distinguishing what is conceived as 'human' from what is conceived as 'non-human'. The other context is that of membership in societies, which under certain circumstances can be characterized either by the presence or the lack of freedom. The article argues that, while at first glance Oakeshott's ideas look counter-intuitive, at a deeper level this understanding of freedom is akin to that prevalent in the consciousness of modern liberal societies. © SAGE Publications Ltd.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleEuropean Journal of Political Theoryen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1177/1474885103002001279en_US
dc.subjectChoiceen_US
dc.subjectCivil associationen_US
dc.subjectContingencyen_US
dc.subjectFreedomen_US
dc.subjectHuman agencyen_US
dc.subjectIdealismen_US
dc.subjectLiberalismen_US
dc.subjectNegative libertyen_US
dc.subjectOakeshotten_US
dc.subjectRule of lawen_US
dc.titleOakeshott's theory of freedom as recognized contingencyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage57en_US
dc.citation.epage77en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber2en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1474885103002001279en_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US


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