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dc.contributor.authorKennedy, V.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:22:27Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:22:27Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.issn1364-5145
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/23991
dc.description.abstractGraham Greene's Journey Without Maps (1936) largely conforms to the masculine tradition of imperialist travel writing, where the male protagonist emerges as the (sometimes conflicted) hero of his own narrative. Much of Journey Without Maps explores Liberia and Greene's psyche, creating parallels between Africa, the narrator's childhood, and the childhood of the human race, and embodying these parallels in a dense web of tropes and allusions. By contrast, as a woman, Barbara Greene is much less implicated in the imperialist tradition of travel writing, and at times Too Late to Turn Back disrupts some of the assumptions of this tradition through the demystification of the trope of adventure and excitement, the sporadic mockery of self and others, the self-deprecation, and the greater emphasis on reciprocity than is to be found in Journey Without Maps.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleStudies in Travel Writingen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13645145.2014.994927en_US
dc.subjectAdventureen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectAllusionsen_US
dc.subjectChildhooden_US
dc.subjectGender rolesen_US
dc.subjectImperialismen_US
dc.subjectTravel writingen_US
dc.titleConradian quest versus dubious adventure: Graham and Barbara Greene in West Africaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of English Language and Literatureen_US
dc.citation.spage48en_US
dc.citation.epage65en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber19en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13645145.2014.994927en_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francis.en_US


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