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dc.contributor.authorLeighton, C. D. A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:22:15Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:22:15Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-4227
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/23978
dc.description.abstractThis paper is concerned to establish and elucidate the intellectual distinctiveness of the Anglican Non-Jurors of the late Stuart and early Hanoverian period. It places the Non-Jurors in the context of the early Counter-Enlightenment and finds their distinctiveness within it, as a body, in the extent and intensity of their commitment to rationalist, critical historical study as a theological method, reflecting a primitivist, or more precisely, restorationist religious stance. The writings of Charles Leslie and Jeremy Collier are those chiefly used in exemplification. The concluding part of the study enquires into the sources of the Non-Jurors' confidence in the value of historical argument in controversy. It points particularly to the Non-Jurors' use of the practices of contemporary historiography, which regulated the application of rationalism by requiring concurrent application of doctrinal and moral standards.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleJournal of Religious Historyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9809.2005.00344.xen_US
dc.titleThe non-jurors and their historyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Historyen_US
dc.citation.spage241en_US
dc.citation.epage257en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber29en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9809.2005.00344.xen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishingen_US


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