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dc.contributor.authorMutman, M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:17:02Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:17:02Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.issn1463-4996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/23659
dc.description.abstractIn a radical critical gesture, postmodern ethnography emphasizes the concepts of writing, narrative and dialogue against a merely scientific recording of facts. Interestingly, it does not question an outsider's accessibility to cultural space. Instead, ethnographic knowledge is grounded on a philosophical claim on the limited nature of native knowledge itself and is rearticulated by an inclusive gesture which involves the native voice in an authentic expression of diversity. This is a redemptive gesture which fails to interrogate the limit of knowledge and reproduces the conventional ethnographic demand that the other should speak up. Following a deconstructive reading, the article suggests that the ethnographic text should instead open itself to the limit and should remark the radical loss it implies as an ethical opening of and questioning by the other, because this is the limit where the name of 'Man' is inscribed as the name of the native informant. Copyright © 2006 SAGE Publications.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleAnthropological Theoryen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1463499606065033en_US
dc.subjectDeconstructionen_US
dc.subjectEthnographyen_US
dc.subjectNative informanten_US
dc.subjectPostcolonial theoryen_US
dc.subjectPostmodernismen_US
dc.titleWriting culture: postmodernism and ethnographyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Communication and Designen_US
dc.citation.spage153en_US
dc.citation.epage178en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber6en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1463499606065033en_US
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US


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