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dc.contributor.authorMizrak, A.T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSavage, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarzullo, K.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T10:10:09Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T10:10:09Z
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.issn0890-8044
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/23193
dc.description.abstractWhile it is widely understood that criminal miscreants are subverting large numbers of Internet-connected computers (e.g., for bots, spyware, SPAM forwarding), it is less well appreciated that Internet routers are also being actively targeted and compromised. Indeed, due to its central role in end-to-end communication, a compromised router can be leveraged to empower a wide range of direct attacks including eavesdropping, man-in-the-middle subterfuge, and denial of service. In response, a range of specialized anomaly detection protocols has been proposed to detect misbehaving packet forwarding between routers. This article provides a general framework for understanding the design space of this work and reviews the capabilities of various detection protocols. © 2008 IEEE.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleIEEE Networken_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MNET.2008.4476069en_US
dc.subjectComputer crimeen_US
dc.subjectNetwork protocolsen_US
dc.subjectNetwork securityen_US
dc.subjectPacket networksen_US
dc.subjectDenial of serviceen_US
dc.subjectDetection protocolsen_US
dc.subjectEnd-to-end communicationen_US
dc.subjectPacket forwardingen_US
dc.subjectRoutersen_US
dc.titleDetecting compromised routers via packet forwarding behavioren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Computer Engineering
dc.citation.spage34en_US
dc.citation.epage39en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber22en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/MNET.2008.4476069en_US


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