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dc.contributor.authorUral, S. E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYilmazer, S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T09:56:43Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T09:56:43Z
dc.date.issued2010-01en_US
dc.identifier.issn0361-2317
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/22190
dc.description.abstractIn recent studies, contextual situations of applied colours are compared to colours presented as samples or chips. Findings of such studies point out different results in terms of similarities or differences between the evaluations of isolated abstract colours and contextualized situations. Architectural and spatial contexts have their own characteristics regarding colouring criteria, so it is of great importance to examine the architectural spatial colouring process from this point of view. This study explores this process by investigating the consistency of semantic ratings of four sequential stages of the architectural colour design process, namely, colour chips samples, abstract compositions, perspective drawings and 3D models. The architectural context for the study was a simple interior space. Fifteen different colour schemes were applied on the four media representing the stages. Subjects rated the 15 sets against seven bipolar, five-step semantic differential scales. The scales consisted of harmonious-discord, pleasant-unpleasant, comfortableuncomfortable, spacious-confined, static-dynamic, exciting-calming and extroverted-introverted. Findings indicated that there are significant associations between the evaluations of the abstract compositions, the perspective drawings and the 3D models; however, the evaluations of colour chips are significantly different than the others. The medium effect observed mostly between abstract and contextualized media. Additionally, factor analysis showed that pleasantness, harmony, spaciousness and comfort are connected in the evaluations of contextual situations, while pleasantness and harmony differ from spaciousness and comfort in the evaluations of colour chips and abstract compositions. The factor of activity (arousal) (dynamism, excitement, and extroversion) stays the same for all four media. It is also found that different colour characteristics are determinative over different media. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleColor Research and Applicationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1002/col.20583en_US
dc.subjectArchitectural colour design processen_US
dc.subjectArchitectural/spatial contexten_US
dc.subjectColour emotionsen_US
dc.subjectSemantic ratingsen_US
dc.subjectSpatial colouren_US
dc.subject3D modelsen_US
dc.subjectArchitectural/spatial contexten_US
dc.subjectColour emotionsen_US
dc.subjectColour schemesen_US
dc.subjectDesign processen_US
dc.subjectFactor analysisen_US
dc.subjectInterior spaceen_US
dc.subjectMedium effecten_US
dc.subjectSemantic differential scaleen_US
dc.subjectSpatial colouren_US
dc.subjectSpatial contexten_US
dc.subjectAbstractingen_US
dc.subjectDesignen_US
dc.subjectThree dimensionalen_US
dc.subjectColoren_US
dc.titleThe architectural colour design process: an evaluation of sequential media via semantic ratingsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design
dc.citation.spage343en_US
dc.citation.epage351en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber35en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber5en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/col.20583en_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1520-6378


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