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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T09:48:01Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T09:48:01Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.issn1478-0038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/21558
dc.description.abstractOver the summer and autumn of 1739 Philadelphia’s two newspapers published competing versions of a hearing in the Pennsylvania assembly that was described as the ‘Affair of the Tanners’. What began as a minor property dispute in the colonial assembly became, with the aid of the local press, a citywide paper war for the support of the urban populace. This article argues the affair provides unique evidence for competing conceptions of the common good in the eighteenth-century colonial city, and was an expression of conflict with deep roots in Philadelphia’s history. The affair also shows how the medium of print could reflect both transatlantic cultural processes as well as distinctly local grievances, as a group of prosperous city artisans and their opponents utilized the city’s newspapers to articulate competing commonwealth ideologies.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleCultural and Social Historyen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14780038.2015.1050894en_US
dc.subjectArtisansen_US
dc.subjectCommonwealth ideologyen_US
dc.subjectPhiladelphiaen_US
dc.subjectPopular politicsen_US
dc.subjectPrint cultureen_US
dc.subjectTannersen_US
dc.titleHot-heads, gentlemen and the liberties of tradesmen: popular politics and the Philadelphia Tanners’ affair of 1739en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.citation.spage343en_US
dc.citation.epage364en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber12en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14780038.2015.1050894en_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1478-0046


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