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dc.contributor.authorAranyosi, I.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T09:45:00Zen_US
dc.date.available2016-02-08T09:45:00Zen_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.issn0034-0006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/21341
dc.description.abstractThe prospect, in terms of subjective expectations, of immortality under the no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is certain, as pointed out by several authors, both physicists and, more recently, philosophers. The argument, known as quantum suicide, or quantum immortality, has received some critical discussion, but there hasn't been any questioning of David Lewis's point that there is a terrifying corollary to the argument, namely, that we should expect to live forever in a crippled, more and more damaged state, that barely sustains life. This is the prospect of eternal quantum torment. Based on some empirical facts, I argue for a conclusion that is much more reassuring than Lewis's terrible scenario.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleRatioen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9329.2012.00540.xen_US
dc.titleShould we fear quantum torment?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Philosophyen_US
dc.citation.spage249en_US
dc.citation.epage259en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber25en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9329.2012.00540.xen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US


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