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dc.contributor.authorKampf, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCuhadar E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T09:44:20Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T09:44:20Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/21292
dc.description.abstractInteractive conflict resolution and peace education have developed as two major lines of practice to tackle intractable inter-group conflicts. Recently, new media technologies such as social media, computer games, and online dialogue are added to the existing set of tools used for peace education. However, a debate is emerging as to how effective they are in motivating learning and teaching skills required for peace building. We take issue with this question and have conducted a study investigating the effect of different conflict contexts on student learning. We have designed a cross-national experimental study with Israeli-Jewish, Palestinian, and Guatemalan undergraduate students using the Israeli-Palestinian and Guatemalan scenarios in the computer game called "Global Conflicts." The learning effects of these scenarios were systematically analyzed using pre- and post-test questionnaires. The study indicated that Israeli-Jews and Palestinians acquired more knowledge from the Guatemalan game than Guatemalans acquired from the Israeli-Palestinian game. All participants acquired knowledge about proximate conflicts after playing games about these scenarios, and there were insignificant differences between the three national groups. Israeli-Jews and Palestinians playing the Israeli-Palestinian game changed their attitudes about this conflict, while Guatemalans playing the Guatemalan game did not change their attitudes about this case. All participants changed their attitudes about distant conflicts after playing games about these scenarios. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleComputers in Human Behavioren_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.08.008en_US
dc.subjectActive learningen_US
dc.subjectAttitude changeen_US
dc.subjectGlobal Conflictsen_US
dc.subjectGuatemalan civil waren_US
dc.subjectIsraeli-Palestinian conflicten_US
dc.subjectKnowledge acquisition from gamesen_US
dc.subjectArtificial intelligenceen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectSocial networking (online)en_US
dc.subjectStudentsen_US
dc.subjectSurveysen_US
dc.subjectActive Learningen_US
dc.subjectAttitude changeen_US
dc.subjectCivil waren_US
dc.subjectGlobal Conflictsen_US
dc.subjectIsraeli-Palestinian conflicten_US
dc.subjectComputer gamesen_US
dc.titleDo computer games enhance learning about conflicts? A cross-national inquiry into proximate and distant scenarios in Global Conflictsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science
dc.citation.spage541en_US
dc.citation.epage549en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber52en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2014.08.008en_US
dc.publisherPergamon Pressen_US


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