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dc.contributor.authorBirnir, J. K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSatana, N. S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T09:42:31Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T09:42:31Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.issn0010-4140
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/21179
dc.description.abstractThe literature holds that coalition-building parties prefer the policy distance of coalition partners to be as small as possible. In light of continued importance of religion in electoral politics cross-nationally, the distance argument is worrisome for minorities seeking political access because many minorities are of different religion than the majority representatives forming coalitions. The authors suggest plurality parties' objectives to demonstrate inclusiveness outweigh the concern over policy distance. They test their hypotheses on a sample of all electorally active ethnic minorities in democracies from 1945 to 2004. The authors find support for their hypothesis that ethnic parties representing minorities that diverge in religious family from the majority are more likely to be included in governing coalitions than are ethnic minorities at large. It is interesting, however, that they also find that minority parties representing ethnic groups that differ in denomination from the majority are less likely to be included in governing coalitions.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleComparative Political Studiesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0010414012453029en_US
dc.subjectCoalition politicsen_US
dc.subjectEthnic minoritiesen_US
dc.subjectReligionen_US
dc.titleReligion and Coalition Politicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relations
dc.citation.spage3en_US
dc.citation.epage30en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber46en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber1en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0010414012453029en_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.en_US


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