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dc.contributor.authorAydinli, E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T09:35:21Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T09:35:21Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.issn1351-0347
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/20793
dc.description.abstractIn considering the future of budding Middle Eastern democracies, past experience and scholarship show that a possible outcome for even the most "successful" ones is some form of imperfect democracy. Based within the literature on democratic transitions and hybrid regimes, this article explores possible factors leading to such outcomes. It focuses in particular on reform/security dilemmas, and the resulting evolution of dual state structures, in which an unelected and often authoritarian state establishment coexists with democratic institutions and practices, for example, in countries like Russia, Iran, or Pakistan. Much of the literature views such duality as an impasse, and thus considers these countries as trapped within this "hybridness" - discouraging news both for currently defined "hybrid regimes" and for countries like Egypt and Tunisia, which are now launching democratization processes. To better understand the nature and evolution of such regimes, this article looks at the case of Turkey, first tracing the rise and consolidation of the Turkish inner state, generally equated with the Turkish armed forces. It then looks at the apparent diminishing and integration of the inner state through pacts and coalitions among both civilian and military elements, and calls into question whether the pessimistic view of permanent illiberalness is inevitable. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleDemocratizationen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13510347.2013.811194en_US
dc.subjectDemocratizationen_US
dc.subjectHybrid regimesen_US
dc.subjectMiddle Easten_US
dc.subjectReform securityen_US
dc.subjectTransitionsen_US
dc.subjectTurkeyen_US
dc.titleThe reform-security dilemma in democratic transitions: the Turkish experience as model?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.citation.spage1144en_US
dc.citation.epage1164en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber20en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber6en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13510347.2013.811194en_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US


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