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dc.contributor.authorJust, D.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-08T09:35:02Z
dc.date.available2016-02-08T09:35:02Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.issn0190-0013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/20777
dc.description.abstractThis article examines Jean-Paul Sartre's concept of committed literature as a manifestation of the tendency in Western modernity of conceiving literature as a form of praxis anchored in work. Discussing an alternative idea of engagement formulated by Maurice Blanchot, Roland Barthes, and Albert Camus, the essay develops a notion of exhausted literature that questions the prioritization of work and action in predominant models of commitment. Exhaustion is proposed as a politically and ethically motivated literary strategy of suspending the group-forming morality which, as a product of modern valorization of work and action, has accompanied literature of verisimilitude, activity, and oriented time. © 2013 The Johns Hopkins University Press.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titlePhilosophy and Literatureen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1353/phl.2013.0018en_US
dc.titleExhausted literature: work, action, and the dilemmas of literary commitmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage291en_US
dc.citation.epage313en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber37en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/phl.2013.0018en_US
dc.publisherThe Johns Hopkins University Pressen_US


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