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dc.contributor.advisorÖzdamar, Özgür
dc.contributor.authorCanbolat, Sercan
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T20:05:16Z
dc.date.available2016-01-08T20:05:16Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/17014
dc.descriptionAnkara : The Department of International Relations İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references leaves 163-179.en_US
dc.description.abstractPolitical Islam and particular Islamist organizations have broadly gained strength across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) in the post-Cold War era. The Muslim Brotherhood (MB) is viewed as the world‘s largest and most influential Islamist organization impinging upon the wider landscape of contemporary MENA politics. The psychological approach contends that the characteristics of leaders making foreign policy are crucial to understanding ultimate foreign policy outcomes (Hudson 2005). In this literature, the study of leaders‘ beliefs is one the most progressive approaches to world politics which focuses on leaders‘ belief systems and their impacts on foreign policy-making (Leites 1951; George 1969). By utilizing the operational code analysis, this research aims to unravel the general patterns of Islamist foreign policy iv manifested itself in three MB-affiliated MENA leaders‘ foreign policy behaviors in the post-Arab uprisings era: Egypt‘s Morsi, Tunisia‘s Ghannouchi, and Hamas‘ Meshaal. Two main hypotheses are posited in this thesis. First, the foreign policy beliefs of three MB-affiliated MENA leaders are not significantly different from the world leaders‘ included in the ‗norming group.‘ Secondly, it is hypothesized that foreign policy behaviors of three Islamist leaders designate uniformity pattern even though these leaders operate in quite different political and cultural settings. The analysis results yield that operational codes of three MB leaders are analogous to the average world leader‘s since there are only a few statistically significant differences. The findings also support the argument that despite operating in different political systems, all three MBIslamists exhibit similar foreign policy behaviors towards the ‗other‘ in a strategic environment.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityCanbolat, Sercanen_US
dc.format.extentxiv, 182 leaves, charts, platesen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectOperational Code Analysisen_US
dc.subjectIslamist Foreign Policyen_US
dc.subjectMuslim Brotherhooden_US
dc.subjectForeign Policy Analysisen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Leadershipen_US
dc.subject.lccBP173.7 .C36 2014en_US
dc.subject.lcshIslam and politics.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIslam and politics--Middle East.en_US
dc.titleUnderstanding the new middle eastern leaders : an operational code approachen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.publisherBilkent Universityen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.itemidB147485


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