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dc.contributor.advisorGürata, Ahmet
dc.contributor.authorAkkuş, Murat Baran
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T18:20:51Z
dc.date.available2016-01-08T18:20:51Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/15568
dc.descriptionAnkara : The Department of Communication and Design, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references leaves 87-88.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe historical attitudes toward death are compared with the philosophical tradition of death contemplation to suggest points of divergence and similarities on the notion of the death of the body. Technological transformations of the attitudes toward body that are established through new modes of perception are often confined into the narrow understanding of Cartesian philosophy. Merleau-Ponty’s notion of flesh overcomes the dualistic consequences of the representational theory of perception thus offering a unified understanding to the elementary relation of bodies to their world. Death must be understood in this bodily sense of Being on which the technological makeup of the daily life plays a crucial and transformative role. The changes in the tradition of Vanitas and the technological penetration of body in Cronenberg’s cinema are prime expressions of bodily death. Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology and textual and visual expressions of encounters with technology and nature are used in order to propose a transformative project to re-establish a primal relation with the intertwinings of death and life.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityAkkuş, Murat Baranen_US
dc.format.extentvii, 88 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectDeathen_US
dc.subjectBodyen_US
dc.subjectFleshen_US
dc.subjectTechnologyen_US
dc.subjectPhenomenologyen_US
dc.subject.lccBD444 .A55 2013en_US
dc.subject.lcshDeath.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTechnology--Social aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshDeath in motion pictures.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPhilosophy in motion pictures.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPhenomenology.en_US
dc.titleTechnological transformation of the perception of deathen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Communication and Designen_US
dc.publisherBilkent Universityen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.itemidB135503


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