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dc.contributor.advisorŞatana, Nil Seda
dc.contributor.authorÖzpek, Burak Bilgehan
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T18:11:52Z
dc.date.available2016-01-08T18:11:52Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/14987
dc.descriptionAnkara : The Department of International Relations, Bilkent University, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) -- Bilkent University, 2010.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references leaves 216-238.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe end of the Cold War has given rise to the number of non-state political actors such as de facto states. While scholarly attention has been given to the concept of sovereignty and to empirical analyses of de facto statehood, de facto states as influential non-state political actors remained theoretically under-studied. This dissertation tackles the research question of how an issue that de facto states causes affects the likelihood of conflict between a parent and an external state. I examine the “opportunity and willingness” pre-theoretical framework of Most and Starr (1989) in order to comprehend how de facto states cause inter-state military conflict. I argue that the process of fighting for de facto statehood and the outcome of becoming a de facto state both create opportunity for the parent and external states. Moreover, internal dynamics in a state are important to understand whether the states are willing to exploit the interaction opportunity de facto states generate. I especially examine regime type and levels of democracy in parent, external and de facto states and argue that when these are all democracies, v likelihood of militarized disputes decrease. Using the comparative method and most similar systems design, I analyze two cases: Kurdistan Regional Government, Iraq, Turkey and South Ossetia, Georgia, Russia. Both cases support the arguments of the dissertation. I conclude with a brief summary and implications of the findings for future scholarship.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityÖzpek, Burak Bilgehanen_US
dc.format.extentxiii, 238 leavesen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectDe facto stateen_US
dc.subjectArmed conflicten_US
dc.subjectMilitarized disputeen_US
dc.subjectKurdistan Regional Governmenten_US
dc.subjectSouth Ossetiaen_US
dc.subjectOpportunityen_US
dc.subjectWillingnessen_US
dc.subjectDemocracyen_US
dc.subjectDemocratizationen_US
dc.subjectDemocratizationen_US
dc.subject.lccKZ4041 .O97 2010en_US
dc.subject.lcshDe facto doctrines.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSovereignty.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMilitary occupation.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRecognition (International law)en_US
dc.subject.lcshInternational relations.en_US
dc.subject.lcshConflict management.en_US
dc.subject.lcshState, The.en_US
dc.titleDe Facto states and inter-state military conflictsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.publisherBilkent Universityen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.identifier.itemidB122169


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