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dc.contributor.authorBerument, H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDogan, N.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T12:00:51Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T12:00:51Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2941
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/12264
dc.description.abstractThere is a rich array of evidence that suggests that changes in sleeping patterns affect an individual's decision-making processes. A nationwide sleeping-pattern change happens twice a year when the Daylight Saving Time (DST) change occurs. Kamstra, Kramer, and Levi argued in 2000 that a DST change lowers stock market returns. This study presents evidence that DST changes affect the relationship between stock market return and volatility. Empirical evidence suggests that the positive relationship between return and volatility becomes negative on the Mondays following DST changes.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titlePsychological Reportsen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.2466/13.17.PR0.109.6.863-878en_US
dc.subjectTraffic accidentsen_US
dc.subjectReturn trade-offen_US
dc.subjectSleep-deprivationen_US
dc.subjectAsset returnsen_US
dc.subjectLosing sleepen_US
dc.subjectInternational evidenceen_US
dc.subjectRisken_US
dc.subjectPricesen_US
dc.subjectEquilibriumen_US
dc.subjectModelsen_US
dc.titleEffects of daylight saving time changes on stock market volatility: a replyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Economicsen_US
dc.citation.spage863en_US
dc.citation.epage878en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber109en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2466/13.17.PR0.109.6.863-878en_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1558-691X


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