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dc.contributor.authorKutan, A. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYigit, T. M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T11:59:08Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T11:59:08Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.issn0939-3625
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/11873
dc.description.abstractWe estimate the determinants of labor productivity growth in 8 new European Union (EU) member states that joined the Union in 2004. Our focus is on the impact of globalization and EU integration efforts on labor productivity growth. Previous studies test the impact of trade using either exports or trade openness. We also test the impact of imports separately on labor productivity growth. Using panel data for 1995-2006 period, we find that globalization has mixed effects. FDI and exports improve productivity, but imports hurt it. Regarding domestic variables, we find that human capital is the most important source of labor productivity growth in the new member states. There is also considerable adjustment of labor productivity towards EU15 levels, indicating significant "catching up" and hence real convergence. Policy implications of the findings are also discussed. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleEconomic Systemsen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecosys.2009.03.002en_US
dc.subjectConvergenceen_US
dc.subjectEuropean Unionen_US
dc.subjectProductivityen_US
dc.subjectTransition economiesen_US
dc.titleEuropean integration, productivity growth and real convergence: evidence from the new member statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Economicsen_US
dc.citation.spage127en_US
dc.citation.epage137en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber33en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber2en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecosys.2009.03.002en_US
dc.publisherElsevier BVen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1878-5433


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