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dc.contributor.authorMüftüler-Bac, M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T11:55:57Z
dc.date.available2015-07-28T11:55:57Z
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-3287
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/10809
dc.description.abstractThe ultimate objective of the modern Turkish republic was to be recognized as a European state. The Cold War structures enabled the realization of that goal. Turkey's Europeanness was defined according to its geostrategic position; it became a reliable ally for the West as a buffer state against the former Soviet Union. The disappearance of the Cold War structures have brought the importance and suitability of Turkey for Europe into debate. In order to secure its position in the European order, Turkey had to redefine its policy formulations, as determined by Turkey's Eastern connections (whilst attending to the essentially non-Western elements in Turkey such as Kurdish nationalism and Islam). This article analyses how the new Turkish foreign policy in the Middle East, which is motivated to secure its place in Europe, brings out the non-Western elements in Turkey. The aim is to determine the extent to which such changes will shape Turkey's futures.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleFuturesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.1016/0016-3287(96)00005-5en_US
dc.titleTurkey's predicament in the post-Cold War eraen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage255en_US
dc.citation.epage268en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber28en_US
dc.citation.issueNumber3en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0016-3287(96)00005-5en_US
dc.publisherPergamon Pressen_US


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