Now showing items 1-3 of 3

    • Disgust and mating strategy 

      Al-Shawaf, L.; Lewis, D. M. G.; Buss, D. M. (Elsevier Inc., 2015-05)
      An evolutionary task analysis predicts a connection between disgust and human mating, two important but currently disconnected areas of psychology. Because short-term mating strategies involve sex with multiple partners ...
    • Mating strategy, disgust, and food neophobia 

      Al-Shawaf, L.; Lewis, D. M. G.; Alley, T. R.; Buss, D. M. (Elsevier, 2015)
      Food neophobia and disgust are commonly thought to be linked, but this hypothesis is typically implicitly assumed rather than directly tested. Evidence for the connection has been based on conceptually and empirically ...
    • Parasite stress and pathogen avoidance relate to distinct dimensions of political ideology across 30 nations 

      Tybur J.M.; Inbar Y.; Aarøe L.; Barclay P.; Barlowe F.K.; De Barra M.; Beckerh D.V.; Borovoi L.; Choi I.; Choik J.A.; Consedine N.S.; Conway A.; Conway J.R.; Conway P.; Adoric V.C.; Demirci D.E.; Fernández A.M.; Ferreirat D.C.S.; Ishii K.; Jakšic I.; Ji T.; Van Leeuwen F.; Lewis D.M.G.; Li N.P.; McIntyre J.C.; Mukherjee S.; Park J.H.; Pawlowski B.; Petersen M.B.; Pizarro D.; Prodromitis G.; Prokop P.; Rantala M.J.; Reynolds L.M.; Sandin B.; Sevi B.; De Smet D.; Srinivasan N.; Tewari S.; Wilson C.; Yong J.C.; Žezelj I. (National Academy of Sciences, 2016)
      People who are more avoidant of pathogens are more politically conservative, as are nations with greater parasite stress. In the current research, we test two prominent hypotheses that have been proposed as explanations ...