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dc.contributor.authorZimmermann, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-28T07:55:33Z
dc.date.available2022-04-28T07:55:33Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1338-5410
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/78172
dc.description.abstractThis contribution first challenges the traditional view of a linear, gradually advancing, and unbroken development of metalwork in Anatolia, with the simple mechanical treatment of solid copper as an indispensable precursor for complex extractive metallurgy. The present evidence rather testifies to a “second coming” of metalwork in the second half of the 4th millennium BC, after metallurgical activities remained largely idle after their inception around 5.000 BC. In the second part, phenomena like the absence of founder’s burials in Bronze Age Anatolia are reviewed, to deliberate about the communication of skill and knowledge for smelting, casting and refining metal.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.source.titleAnodos. Studies of Ancient Worlden_US
dc.subjectAnatoliaen_US
dc.subjectChalcolithicen_US
dc.subjectEarly bronze ageen_US
dc.subjectMetalworken_US
dc.subjectMetalsmithsen_US
dc.subjectBurialsen_US
dc.titleMaster and apprentice some thoughts on Anatolian Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age metalwork and the many dimensions of communicating skills and expertiseen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Archaeologyen_US
dc.citation.spage265en_US
dc.citation.epage274en_US
dc.citation.volumeNumber15en_US
dc.publisherTrnavska Univerzita * Filozoficka Fakultaen_US
dc.contributor.bilkentauthorZimmermann, Thomas
buir.contributor.orcidZimmermann, Thomas|en_US


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