Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorToulopoulou, Timothea
dc.contributor.authorArslan, Seda
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-11T08:03:28Z
dc.date.available2019-09-11T08:03:28Z
dc.date.copyright2019-08
dc.date.issued2019-09
dc.date.submitted2019-09-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/52414
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of article.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.): Bilkent University, Department of Psychology, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2019.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 42-54).en_US
dc.description.abstractFormer studies revealed that exposure to early life adversity is correlated with alterations in the white matter structure, particularly, in the areas associated with executive functioning and memory. Those alterations include both volume and microstructural white matter integrity reductions in the brain. A vast amount of the studies focused on volume reductions, and it is not clear whether the alterations in the white matter integrity is associated with cognitive functioning. The current study investigated the influence of early life stress on white matter integrity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)and corpus callosum (CC) among the forty-six healthy participants. Participants were split into two groups based on the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA.Q). Participants with relatively low early life stress were compared with participants with relatively high early life stress on fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values in the ACC and CC. Another analysis investigated the working memory performance of the participants in the n-back task. Findings revealed that low-level early life stress did not significantly differ from high-level of early life stress in terms of FA values. However, there were significantly higher MD values in the high-level early life stress group compared to low-level early life stress group. In terms of cognitive performance, there were no performance differences between the two groups on the n-back task. The findings suggest that the high level of early life stress is associated with subtle white matter integrity changes in the brain but does not affect the performance.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Seda Arslanen_US
dc.format.extentxii, 59 leaves : illustrations, charts (some color) ; 30 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen_US
dc.subjectDiffusion tensor imagingen_US
dc.subjectEarly life stressen_US
dc.subjectWorking memory performanceen_US
dc.titleThe effect of early life stress on brain white matter integrity and working memory performanceen_US
dc.title.alternativeBeyin beyaz cevher madde bütünlüğü ve çalışma bellek performansı üzerine erken yaşam stresinin etkisien_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.publisherBilkent Universityen_US
dc.description.degreeM.S.en_US
dc.identifier.itemidB151535


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record