Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBilgin, Pınaren_US
dc.contributor.editorBurgess, J. P.
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-30T10:37:23Z
dc.date.available2019-04-30T10:37:23Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9780415484374
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11693/51037
dc.description.abstractIdentity is a social construct. So is security. Conventional approaches to security have, for long, denied the constructedness of both, offering instead a conception that takes identity as pre-given and its relationship to security as negative – i.e. identity concerns as a source of insecurity. Increasingly since the 1990s, critical approaches to security have revealed the identity/security nexus as one of co-constitution, which allowed for considering identity as a source of security as well. In doing so, critical approaches have looked into identity dynamics in broader terms – i.e. not only in terms of ethnic, religious, linguistic differences, but in terms of a wide range of ‘self-other’ dynamics.en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Routledge handbook of new security studiesen_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttps://doi.org/10.4324/9780203859483en_US
dc.titleIdentity/securityen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.departmentDepartment of International Relationsen_US
dc.departmentDepartment of Political Science and Public Administrationen_US
dc.citation.spage81en_US
dc.citation.epage89en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4324/9780203859483en_US
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_US
dc.identifier.eisbn9780203859483


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record